Archive for August, 2009|Monthly archive page

Reality vs. best practices (and getting from one to the other)

If you’ve spent any time studying best practices in software engineering, it can be jarring to discover how far the reality of software production often diverges from the ideal.  It isn’t rare to see code in production — stuff that’s critical to a company’s business — that isn’t even under version control, much less documented with bug-fixes tracked to requirements, testing infrastructure in place, etc.

Personally, I like doing reverse-engineering (restoration of lost knowledge) — taking a bundle of mysterious old code and figuring out exactly how it works and what it’s doing, so that it can be upgraded or replaced.  I’ve done it for more than one company.  However (at the risk of cutting down on the need for this sort of work), I’ll tell you that it’s cheaper to fix “free-fall code” while you still have the engineers who designed it on hand, before a reverse-engineering effort becomes necessary.  It’s a little like an old building with electrical wiring that’s not up to code:  replacing all the wiring seems expensive for something that yields no visible results, yet it’s cheaper than leaving the old wiring in place to catch fire and burn the building down.

How does free-fall code get all the way to production?  In my experience, there are a couple of main causes:  Continue reading

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